A Day of Discovery in Denver

Denver is surprisingly close to the Rocky Mountains, which means you’re never short of mountain views while in the city. We only had one day in Denver at the tail end of our Colorado adventure (which you can read about here,  here, and with amazing sand dunes here) before our two days of driving back to Chicago.

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - State Capitol

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - State Capitol

 

Since we only had one day we wanted to get a bit of an early start, and probably started our self-made walking tour of downtown around 10:00am. Let’s just say that we were definitely not impressed the first few hours in the city. There seemed to be camps of people (quite literally camps, with tents, chairs and everything) around every second corner with many of them giving an all new meaning to the ‘mile high city.’ It overall gave us a bit of an uneasy feeling while walking around. We did, however, find time for a few quick shots around the Colorado State Capitol building and loved the view from one mile above sea level.

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - State Capitol

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - State Capitol

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - State Capitol

 

We ventured over to the LoDo neighbourhood and found Urban Farmer, a modern yet rustic steakhouse with delicious brunch options and outdoor seating. Things were starting to turn around.

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - LoDo

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - LoDo

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Urban Farmer

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Urban Farmer

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Urban Farmer

 

Our brunch was excellent, the sun was shining, and my mimosa and Bettina's bloody mary bar were on point.

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Urban Farmer

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Urban Farmer

 

We can definitely recommend Urban Farmer if you're looking for a great Sunday brunch spot!

No sooner had we finished eating were we looking for even more food. Bettina had been talking to a few locals on Instagram and received a large list of places to go to. The Milk Market at Dairy Block came highly recommend to us, and we can only pass along the recommendations.

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Dairy Block Milk Market

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Dairy Block Milk Market

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Dairy Block Milk Market

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Dairy Block Milk Market

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Dairy Block Milk Market

 

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Customizable Disk Necklace by GLDN

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This bumping market hall was full of modern restaurants and bars all with delicious looking and (smelling!) food. Since we had just eaten brunch, we weren’t that hungry but that has never stopped us in the past from indulging in more food!

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Dairy Block Milk Market

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Dairy Block Milk Market

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Dairy Block Milk Market

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Dairy Block Milk Market

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Dairy Block Milk Market

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Dairy Block Milk Market

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Dairy Block Milk Market

 

As we strolled around the market, we stumbled upon Morning Jones and just could not resist their decorate your own doughnut station. You basically got six fresh doughnuts on a plate and were free to add as much Oreo crumble, sprinkles, bacon, marshmallows, chocolate sauce, or caramel as you could fit.

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Dairy Block Milk Market Morning Jones

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Dairy Block Milk Market Morning Jones

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Dairy Block Milk Market Morning Jones

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Dairy Block Milk Market Morning Jones

 

For better or worse, we finished it all and were thoroughly stuffed the rest of the day. We spent the rest of the afternoon walking along 16th Street doing some shopping before heading back to Chicago.

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver

 

On our way to leave the city, we drove through the RiNo neighborhood, a trendy and artsy neighborhood too cool for us to be let in. We didn’t have time to stop, but it is definitely at the top of our list when back in Denver. Our drive back to Chicago took us through Nebraska and of course, Bettina had to capture the essence of the state by taking some sunset pictures in corn fields!

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Nebraska

 

A Day of Discovery in Denver - Nebraska

 

 

Have you been to Denver for the day? If so, have you been to the Milk Market?

 

Make sure to pin this pin to your favourite personal travel board on Pinterest so that our tips are only one click away!

 

 


 

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How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

This might not surprise you, but I love flying! It’s not just the thought about going someplace which is new and exciting, but the actual in-flight experience as well. Being on a plane is one of the only times I’m not expected to work or be online so it’s a time when I can relax completely. If you are like most people, you probably feel the complete opposite and dread flying. I want to share some tips with you on how you can make flying more relaxing and how to not feel as stiff and tense when you get off the plane. (You can read about my tips on how to get over jet lag here.)

 

How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

 

A lot of people have high muscle tension after flying, especially after long-haul flights, and have swollen legs and feet. Part of the reason for stiffness is dehydration and the consumption of too much sodium (airplane food is filled with tons of salt and sugar because your taste buds can’t taste flavors as well due to the altitude and pressure). However, the biggest issue is that we tend to sit in our tight seats for hours without moving.

 

How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

 

Wearing comfortable clothing while flying makes a big difference. Joriki has the most comfortable leggings I have ever worn and they are perfect for long-haul flights. You can combine them with a light top and sweater in case it gets cold.

 

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This Sumba Warrior outfit by Joriki was gifted to me. I truly believe in their mission of giving back with every purchase and can highly recommend their apparel. You can get 10% off your purchase using my discount code 'beingbettina'.

 

How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

 

While it’s not always easy to get up and stretch in the hallway and the back of the plane (after all, we wouldn’t want to pause that movie or wake up the person next to us) there are easy and useful stretches you can do in your seat. And if you do these after the flight attendants dim the cabin light, you won’t even get any awkward stares!

 

I’m not a yoga instructor and am not offering any physical advice. This post is aimed at providing ideas on how to stretch during a flight. Please make sure you don’t strain yourself when trying these poses.

 

In Flight Yoga Stretch and Breathing

 

To start, interlock your hands and lift your arms straight up stretching your upper body, shoulders, and chest. Focus on your breathing – inhale and exhale slowly, counting to 7 for each inhale and exhale.

 

How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

 

How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

 

 

In Flight Yoga Foot Point and Flex

 

To get the blood in your feet flowing, sit upright with your feet on the floor. Lift one leg up slightly and point your foot. Keep this position for a few seconds and then flex your foot, making sure you spread the toes wide apart. Point and flex a few times and put your leg back down. Repeat this stretch with the other leg.

 

How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

 

How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

 

 

In Flight Yoga Knee Hug

 

This might be more difficult for people who are very tall and struggle with the confined space on a plane. I also suggest removing your shoes and putting on socks if you are not wearing any out of respect for your seat neighbours.

Place both heels on the edge of your seat, hug your knees with both arms and pull them towards you. Hold this position for a few seconds while breathing slowly, then release.

 

How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

 

 

How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

 

 

In Flight Yoga Shoulder Stretch

 

This works best if you have a blanket you can roll up to a “blanket burrito”.

Sit up straight with both feet on the ground. Roll up your blanket and place it vertically against the backrest of your seat. Lean against the blanket so that it aligns with your spine and keep your arms at rest. Breath in and squeeze your shoulders upwards and backward. Exhale slowly and bring your shoulders down.

You can repeat this pose a few times but make sure you don’t strain yourself when squeezing your shoulders.

 

How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

 

How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

 

How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

 

How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

 

 

In Flight Yoga Spinal Twist

 

By far my favorite in flight yoga pose is the seated spinal twist. Sit up straight with both feet on the floor and slide forward on your seat so that you have space between your back and the backrest. Place the right hand on the seat with the fingers pointing backward. There might not always be enough space to do so, in which case you can make a fist instead. Grab the right corner of the seat cushion with your left hand, or if that’s not possible, place your left hand on the outer side of your right knee. Straighten the spine and twist to the right, looking over the right shoulder.

Do the same on the opposite side.

 

How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

 

How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

 

 

In Flight Yoga Forward Bend

 

If you’re able to get up and move to the back of the plane, there is usually a little bit of space to stretch. I like doing simple forward bends standing up or sitting down, depending on how clean the floors are on the plane. To do a forward bend, sit on the floor (or stand) with your legs straight. Exhale and bend forward from the hip joints, reaching for your toes with both your hands. Inhale and stretch further as you exhale.

 

How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

 

How To Relax on a Plane with These In Flight Yoga Poses

 

I don’t do yoga nearly as often as I should, but I find that these 6 stretches help me release muscle tension during the flight.

 

How do you fly? Do you usually get up and walk around during your flight or do you remain in your seat?

 


 

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Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

After a restful sleep, we took our time getting packed up, cleaned up, and walking along the river. This was the first time on our trip we put our fancy new camping shower and with pop-up tent to use. Despite pouring a pot of boiling water into mix with the “room temperature” (ie. freezing cold) water we had with us, the water flowing out of the shower head was frighteningly cold, causing fits of giggles to laugh off the pain. It was probably one of the least enjoyable, yet most satisfying showers I have ever had. After camping for a number days it felt great to have a fresh start to the day.

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

We used this Green Elephant outdoor shower tent, the Nemo Helio outdoor shower, and this cute Nemo Helio green floor mat.

 

                                       

 

All products we link are the actual products we use and we would not recommend them if we didn't truly like them. We are participants in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program which is designed to provide a means to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. 

 


Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

Not far from our campsite was Animas Forks, a ghost town and relic of the heydays of mining in the San Juans. The first buildings were constructed in the 1870’s, and by the early 1880’s the town was home to 450 people, complete with a post office, general store, saloon and a telephone.

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

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The great thing about exploring Animas Forks is that you can walk inside all of the buildings to get a real sense of how it might have been to live here back in the day. Some buildings still had preserved wallpaper or ornate woodwork, but most had substantially succumbed to the elements.

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

The crown jewel of the town is the grand, two-storey Duncan Residence, built in 1879 to withstand the long cold winters. Previously, most residents of Animas Forks spent the winters a bit further south in Silverton (which you can read about here). The Duncans were one of the first families to brave the full winter in Animas Forks where the snow would easily bury the first floor of the house!

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

We enjoyed exploring the town, though didn’t see any ghosts, and were soon headed towards our final, and highest offroad pass of the trip: Engineer Pass. We zig-zagged our way up the shelf roads with plenty of multi-point turns to get around the corners.

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop - View of Animas Forks

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

We own a Toyota Tacoma and were extremely happy with its performance throughout the trip. This post is not sponsored by Toyota but we can highly recommend them.

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

We came to a breathtaking viewpoint, “Oh Point”, with an almost 360 degree view of the mountains and valleys around us. We must have taken hundreds of pictures trying to capture the moment and the beauty of our surroundings.

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

After what felt like an eternity, we reached the 12,800 ft (3,901 m) summit of Engineer Pass and stopped for a ceremonial picture before quickly jumping back into the car to escape the wind and the cold and head down the other side.

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

No sooner had we started our decent and there were a few locals blocking the road and getting in our way!

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

It took us a couple of days and with a few detours, but we finally completed the famous Alpine Loop. This was something I had on my bucket list for a number of years and I was glad to have successfully completed the loop, taking in all the magnificent views along the way.

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

It wasn’t the end of our driving day though as we had a few hours of highway driving to reach our next campsite! However, compared to the last days of offroading, highway driving was a welcomed change. We arrived in the dark at the Black Canyon of the Gunnison. It was a beautiful warm summer night and we enjoyed sitting in front of the stars and taking it all in.

Not knowing what to expect of the Canyon because we arrived in the dark, we set off the next day and enjoyed our coffee with some prime canyon views.

 

Black Canyon of the Gunnison

 

Black Canyon of the Gunnison

 

The Black Canyon of the Gunnison is famous for its dramatic views, as it is especially deep, narrow and steep compared to some of the more famous canyons around. Why is it called the Black Canyon you wonder? It's because some parts of the canyon are so narrow and deep they receive only 33 minutes of sunlight each day.

 

Black Canyon of the Gunnison

 

Black Canyon of the Gunnison

 

 

As we were having coffee, we made friends with this little guy who was hoping for some breakfast.

 

Black Canyon of the Gunnison

 

Black Canyon of the Gunnison

 

Black Canyon of the Gunnison

 

The Canyon was our last stop before going back to civilization and at this point, we were both looking forward to a real bed. We had camped for five days in a row which was certainly pushing our limits. (Did you read about our nights in the Sand Dunes, in Silverton, and Ouray?) I'm not sure I'll be able to convince Bettina to go on another camping trip anytime soon but the trip was a dream of mine for years and the entire adventure made it all worthwhile.

 

Animas Forks and the Alpine Loop

 

Have you completed your dream road trip yet? What was your longest camping trip?

 


 

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Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado

Ouray is a beautiful mountain town tucked away in the San Juan Mountains of southern Colorado. We arrived at camp with plenty of time to set up our tent in full daylight which was a nice change.  Once again we were warned of bears in the area, but at least this time it was a proper campground with other people all around, for better or worse. Read about our bear scare during our first night here.

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado

 

Sometimes our laziness gets the best of us and since we were so close to downtown Ouray we decided to head into town for dinner. The charming town really just has one main street, but it is bursting with places to eat and drink. We chose Ouray Brewing Company for the great rooftop patio views!

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado

 

The food and beer also lived up to expectations and were delicious! With full stomachs we settled in for an excellent night’s sleep, but not before some stargazing! The wilderness of Colorado provides an amazing opportunity to see more stars than you have ever seen before! It has been quite some time since Bettina and I have seen the Milky Way, but it was back in force under a clear Colorado night.

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Milky Way

 

The next day we arose early as we had a full day of driving ahead of us with three main passes on the agenda. Bettina couldn't resist posing next to the 'Switzerland of America' sign!

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado

 

First up was Corkscrew Pass, living up to its name by twisting uphill between the creatively named Red Mountain 1 and Red Mountain 2. The road was steep and surprisingly busy as we encountered a number of modified Jeeps and ATV’s, making our stock Toyota Tacoma from Illinois look slightly out of place.

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Red Mountain 1

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Red Mountain 1

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Red Mountain 1

 

At 12,257 ft (3,736 m) high, the top offered expansive views of the surrounding alpine area.  We didn’t hang around for long though as the wind negated all the warming effects of the sun. We continued on climbing slightly higher to Hurricane Pass at 12,730 ft (3,880 m) and then climbed further still across the laid-back California Pass at 12,963 ft (3,951 m).

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Hurricane Pass

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - California Pass

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado

 

Unfortunately, even though the road was relatively flat, it was very rough with a lot of large rocks, so our progress was slow.

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado

 

As we noted in our Silverton post (which you can read about here) this area experienced a mining boom in the late 1800s and you could see remnants of old mines scattered amongst the mountains, even at seemingly impossible locations.

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Sound Democrat Mill

 

We came across the impressively preserved Sound Democrat Mill which has been maintained and preserved as good as possible in a remote area like this.

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Sound Democrat Mill

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Sound Democrat Mill

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Sound Democrat Mill

 

The mill was built in 1905 to process the mineral-rich ore mined from the surrounding hills.  The ore was transported by a network of aerial trams and then processed through this gravity-fed mill to be crushed, stamped, and stripped of all the valuable minerals.

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Sound Democrat Mill

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Sound Democrat Mill

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Sound Democrat Mill

 

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Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Sound Democrat Mill

 

The mill ceased operations in 1914, having never turned a profit. Being able to walk inside the mill and climb to the various levels on rickety ladders was a humbling experience. Even though the massive old machinery has been sitting here for over 100 years, you definitely get a sense of the difficulty and hard-work involved to keep this mill operating.

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Sound Democrat Mill

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Sound Democrat Mill

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Sound Democrat Mill

 

Soon we were back on the road, or the vague imitation of a road, that was California Pass. It was incredibly rough, and we were driving at less than a walking pace. Luckily we didn’t have much further to go before setting up camp along the Animas River.

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado

 

There was a truck parked nearby with an older woman sitting in the cab the whole time we were setting up our tent and preparing dinner. Curious to hear her story, we walked over to talk to her as it was getting dark and she appeared to have no tent or other items with her. Chatting for a few minutes, we learned that she was waiting for her husband to arrive who was hiking to this point and had set off from Ouray that morning. We were confused – we left Ouray that morning as well and had spent over eight hours driving to get his far. Surely we misunderstood?

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Animas River

 

We went back to preparing and then eating our dinner. Another hour passed and there was still no sign of her husband. The sun was long gone, the sky was getting darker, and the air colder by the minute. Then off in the distance, there was a man walking along the road, with a stick in hand, making his way towards our group. Sure enough, it was her husband who she was very happy to see arriving with a smile and all in one piece.  Eager to get the full story, we went back to chat with them and confirmed that he had in fact left Ouray that morning just before sunrise and had hiked over a handful of almost 13,000 ft mountain passes to get to the same point it took us all day to drive to! The man was very cheerful and seemed to have enjoyed every minute of it – so much so that he was going to do it all over again the next day. Oh, and he was well over twice our age – definitely putting us to shame!

 

Ouray and California Dreaming in Colorado - Milky Way

 

Would you rather hike across a pass or offroad like we did? Let us know in the comments below!

 


 

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How To Get Over Jet Lag

With my family living in Switzerland, Kyle's family living in Vancouver, Canada, and us living in Chicago, we travel through time zones a lot and have experienced our fair share of jet lag. I want to share with you my best tips on how to get over jet lag quickly after travelling across multiple time zones.

 

How To Get Over Jet Lag

 

What is Jet Lag?

 

Jet lag is a phenomenon which can occur when your personal biological 24-hour clock is altered which often happens after fast long-distance East-West travel. This means any time you fly through several time zones to get from North America to Europe, from Europe to Asia, or any other East-West/West-East combination you could think of, your body thinks it is in the time zone you started in and first needs to adjust to the new time zone.

The most common Jet Lag symptoms are poor sleep, insomnia, or the complete opposite - being tired in the middle of the day which can reduce the ability to focus, cause headaches, etc.

 

How To Get Over Jet Lag

 

The first time I flew to Canada's West Coast from Switzerland, it took me almost a week to recover from the 9 hour time zone change. I was constantly tired during the day and could not stay up past 6pm. In the morning, however, I was wide awake at 4am and could not sleep for another minute. By the time I was adjusted to the new time zone, I was leaving to go back home again. Everyone experiences jet lag differently. I know people who barely notice a difference and others who are like me and need days to recover. There are a few tips I picked up over the last couple of years which helped me - and can help you - to get back into your normal rhythm faster.

 

My Best In-Flight Tips

 

  • Hydrate: When traveling by plane, most people get dehydrated which has to do with the dry air in flight. Humidity on planes varies but is usually below 20% which resembles humidity levels in the desert. Drinking lots of water is key! A rule of thumb is to drink 8oz (250ml) of water for every hour you're in the air. I bring a refillable water bottle with me and fill it up right before I get on the plane. In addition, every time the flight attendant walks past with water, I grab a glass.
  • Avoid caffeine: Try to avoid caffeine or reduce caffeine if possible. Coffee can promote dehydration and can also disturb your sleep rhythm.
  • Avoid alcohol: Similar to the point above, alcohol can worsen dehydration and can increase the terrible feeling you have when getting off a plane. Try to avoid it if possible. After all, we already don't feel the freshest when getting off a long-haul flight so there is no need to add a hangover to the mix. To be completely honest though, Kyle and I don't always subscribe to this rule as we find it hard to resist the free booze. 🙂

 

How To Get Over Jet Lag

 

    • Flying Eastbound: When flying East to Europe, flights often arrive in the morning. To make sure I can take advantage of the entire day, I try to get some sleep on the plane. Now this can be difficult, especially when flying Economy as space is very limited and it's not very comfortable. I bring my own travel pillow and sleep mask and try to book a window seat so that I won't have to get up every time the person next to me needs to go to the washroom. I also find that Advil PM helps me sleep on the plane. (I am not offering any medical advice and please talk to a medical professional before using Advil PM.)
  • Flying Westbound: When flying West to North America, flights often arrive in the afternoon or evening and you will feel the need to sleep on the plane as it is much later in the day where you started the trip. I usually try to stay awake as long as possible to get my body into the new rhythm quickly.

 

How To Get Over Jet Lag

 

How To Get Over Jet Lag

 

 

How to Get Over Jet Lag When You Get Home

 

Once you arrive at your destination or are back home, adjusting to the new time zone right away will help you recover from jet lag the fastest. This means not staying up too late and getting up at a reasonable hour in the morning even if you have to force yourself, and eating meals at standard meal times to get your body adjusted quickly.

 

How To Get Over Jet Lag

 

After a flight Eastbound to Europe, I often find myself wide awake in the middle of the night and not wanting to get up in the morning. These are my best tips to get some rest after an Eastbound flight.

 

How To Get Over Jet Lag

 

How To Get Over Jet Lag

 

  • Use an Eyemask: Not being able to sleep because there are no blinds or the curtains don't darken the room enough is very frustrating. I always bring my eyemask so that it's dark no matter what my environment looks like. I personally love this silk eyemask which is nice against my skin and doesn't bend my eyelashes in the wrong direction. Plus it comes with a really cute eyemask pouch.

 

  • Use Earplugs: Similar to above, you don't know whether your destination is going to be noisy. To avoid any risk, I bring earplugs to help me fall asleep.
  • Get Som Sleep: Som Sleep is a miracle drink that helps you fall asleep within 30 minutes of drinking it. It includes melatonin which is the sleep hormone naturally occurring in our bodies, and other relaxing ingredients. I enjoy the sugar-free version which is sweetened with Stevia Leaf Extract. In the past, I have tried using melatonin supplements to recover from jet lag but I find that Som Sleep works much better due to the combination of ingredients. You can find the zero sugar drink here:

 

 

  • Get Seranaded to Sleep: Last but not least, Kyle and I often put on Sleep Music Delta Waves on youtube when going to bed. I have hardly ever heard the end of the 45-minute song which attests to how well it works!

 

How To Get Over Jet Lag

 

How To Get Over Jet Lag

 

Following a Westbound flight, I tend to be sleepy in the early afternoon and wide awake in the wee hours of the morning.

  • Stay up as late as possible: The best way for me to adjust is to really force myself to stay up until 9pm or as late as possible on the first day. You might want to go to bed earlier but waiting until a later hour helps ensure that you don’t naturally wake up at 4am.
  • Exercise in the evening: I find that exercising in the evening helps me stay up later after a Westbound flight. Even an evening walk around the neighbourhood helps.

 

How To Get Over Jet Lag

 

Remember that all our bodies are different. Some people might adjust quickly to new time zones, while others take a few days. I find that the more I travel, the easier it is to adjust my biological clock. How do you get over jet lag? Do you have any secret tips? Let me know in the comments below!

Thank you, Som Sleep for letting us test your Zero Sugar drink to get over jet lag. All opinions expressed here are my own and I do not recommend products which I didn’t test or am not happy with.


 

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Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado

After a fairly rocky first night to our trip (which you can read about here), we were eager to get back into the rhythm of things and prove to ourselves that we could actually do this whole camping thing for days on end. After all, there is nothing more motivating than waking up with views of cheerful flowers for days.

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado

 

Our next destination was near Silverton, Colorado, but to get there we first had to conquer Cinnamon Pass.

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado

 

The views heading up the pass were breathtaking as we got our first glimpse of the high alpine area of the San Juan Mountains.

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado - Cinnamon Pass

 

Cinnamon Pass is on the southern portion of the famous Alpine Loop. This 65 mile (105km) “loop” is not to be taken lightly though as it is 4x4 only, far from civilization, and crosses two high mountain passes.

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado - Cinnamon Pass

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado - Cinnamon Pass

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado - Cinnamon Pass

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado - Cinnamon Pass

 

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Earlier in the summer, these alpine basins are overflowing with alpine wildflowers, however, we were a few weeks too late to experience them.

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado - Cinnamon Pass

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado - Cinnamon Pass

 

The road was rough and bumpy, but worth the drive when you can conquer the pass and are rewarded with views like this. At least it was worth it for me, Bettina may have other ideas. Our Toyota Tacoma performed extremely well again and we had no issues getting up the steep and rocky roads.

This post is not sponsored by Toyota in any way but we can highly recommend Toyota as we didn't have any problems with the truck throughout the trip.

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado - Cinnamon Pass

 

Clearly, I'm overwhelmed with excitement that we managed to make it to the top.

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado - Cinnamon Pass

 

We reached the top of Cinnamon Pass at 12,640 ft above sea level (3,853 metres) in the early evening, and so we had the whole place to ourselves! We couldn't resist stopping to take in the view and to make sure we remained hydrated. Voss was so kind as to provide us with their flavoured water for our trip, which are incredibly refreshing! My favorite flavour is Lime Mint but Bettina swears by their Lemon Cucumber water.

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado - Voss Water

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado - Voss Water

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado - Voss Water

 

The road downhill on the other side was even rockier, but we were soon setting up camp again hoping for a better nights sleep. This was our second night camping remotely in an area with nobody else around (except for perhaps the odd deer and bear). Luckily we had a much better sleep that night, and with the sun warming up our campsite we packed up our tent and were headed into town.

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado

 

Silverton is a town that appears to be stuck way back in the past, but in a good way. The town was founded back in the 1870’s as a center for the numerous silver mines that were operating in the area. Back in the day, this town was booming, with thousands of prospectors scouring the hills for gold, silver, and everything in between.

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado

 

The town has managed to preserve most of its architecture and feel from that era.

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado

 

We enjoyed walking the streets, feeling like we were on a film set, window-shopping, and also having a connection back to civilization.

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado

 

With buildings like these, you can just imagine what it would have been like to be here over a hundred years ago.

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado

 

While the town is fairly small, it’s easy to fill a day exploring, and we both had a great time. (Can't get enough of Silverton? We also share a few glimpses of the town here.)

 

Stepping Back in Time in Silverton, Colorado

 

Have you been to an old mining town before?

 


 

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Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

I have been wanting to visit Colorado for years and this desire for pristine wilderness, majestic peaks, and the great outdoors has only been further amplified by our life in the flattest state in the United States. We literally couldn’t be further away from the mountains that we both grew up with at our doorsteps.

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

The simple way to solve this problem would be to jump on a plane and arrive in Colorado a few hours later.  However, we rarely do simple. My plan was to drive the nearly 2,400 km (1,500 miles) to our destination in the San Juan mountains in southwest Colorado. My decision to drive was primarily driven by (get it?) our plan to camp, offroad, and explore the more remote regions of Colorado that would require our 4x4 Toyota Tacoma and camping supplies. I say "my decision" because I love to camp but had to convince Bettina to tag along.

We own a Toyota Tacoma and were extremely happy with its performance throughout the trip. This post is not sponsored by Toyota but we can highly recommend them.

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park - Offroading in our Toyota Tacoma

 

We began our drive west early on Friday, beating rush hour out of Chicago and continuing on the 8 or so hours to Lawrence, Kansas where we spent the evening visiting friends.

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park - Offroading in our Toyota Tacoma

 

The next day, we spent hours staring at the rolling hills of Kansas and the endless wind turbines as we made our way to the Colorado state border and eventually to Colorado Springs.

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

The First Day of Offroading

 

We started our adventure at the Garden of the Gods park, which was so stunning, I could write an entire blog post about it. If you haven’t been, the park is very close to Colorado Springs and is a great place to walk and hike while exploring the interesting rock formations.

 

Garden of the Gods Park in Colorado Springs

 

Garden of the Gods Park in Colorado Springs

 

Garden of the Gods Park in Colorado Springs

 

Garden of the Gods Park in Colorado Springs

 

Garden of the Gods Park in Colorado Springs

 

Heading south we had a short 45 minute drive before what we considered the true beginning of our offroading experience when we turned off the paved road. Our first offroading adventure would be to conquer Medano Pass as a test of our rusty 4x4 driving abilities and trial run for the days to come.

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park - Offroading in our Toyota Tacoma

 

We aired down the tires and took in the fresh Colorado air before proceeding up the dusty forestry road. (For the less offroad experienced among you, airing down the tires reduces your risk of punctures to the tires as you drive over sharp rocks. It's crucial though to get the tires back to normal pressure once you get back on the pavement for proper handling and safety.)

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park - Offroading in our Toyota Tacoma

 

We came across a few obstacles that we had to stop and take a second look at before proceeding, but the trail was otherwise perfectly manageable and a lot of fun.

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park - Offroading in our Toyota Tacoma

 

Towards the end of the trail, there were a number of creek crossings which could fill your truck with water if they are deep enough. We didn’t fully appreciate the depth of the water of one particular one until we were smack in the middle of the river with no turning back. The water reached the bottom of the doors of our truck!  This is what it looked like on the Jeep that went through just after us.

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park - Offroading in our Toyota Tacoma

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

Arriving at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

Our destination goal for the day was the Great Sand Dunes National Park. It is a special place where you can freely explore the 30 square miles (78 square km) of dunes and the tallest sand dune in North America, at 750 feet (229 metres).

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

Nearing the end of the trail we could see glimpses of the sand dunes in the distance, and the road turned to sand as well, which was a fun challenge to drive on.

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

Shop Bettina's Look

 

We decided to hike up the sand dunes but almost didn't make it! Bettina and I weren’t yet used to the higher altitude and hadn't eaten much yet that day, which is mainly a way of saying that we're totally out of shape.

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

The views from the top were absolutely breathtaking and definitely worth the effort.

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

 

It was perfectly quiet out on the dunes, and the setting sun cast golden light across the area.

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

We set up camp for the night in a primitive site nearby, with nobody around.

 

Tenting in Bear Country

 

Driving up to our site, we came across a few bear warning signs. Having camped in the Rocky Mountains, we are no beginners at camping in bear country and know to follow the bear rules. The most important of which is to lock all your food items and toiletries in the car and leave nothing at all outside that will attract bears. And yes, bears love toothpaste so make sure you lock it up as well.

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

Not all travels go exactly as planned. This was our first night camping in our tent in a while, and also one of the worst nights we had.

To start off, it was windy which causes the forest to make a lot of noises that your brain can’t always justify as ‘just the wind.’ Next, it rained a couple times throughout the night. While we stayed completely dry, the noise of the rain did wake us up each time.

 

Blown Away at Great Sand Dunes National Park

 

Lastly, we had a few visitors to our camp in the early morning. At around 4:00am we were both awake and could hear something moving around our campsite. It was still very dark outside and fairly quiet except for the noises we were hearing. We both held our breath and listened intently for quite some time. Tents provide a false sense of security against anything that may want to ruin your night. I mustered up the courage to see what was out there, and so we very slowly and very quietly prepared our headlamps and flashlights on our phones for a surprise attack on whatever was out there.

Unzipping the tent I quickly flashed the lights all around and found six eyes reflecting sharply back at me, about 20-30 feet away. Three deer were nonchalantly enjoying an early breakfast around our tent and didn’t seem to be bothered by us being there. After shooing them away, we got a bit more sleep but overall had a very restless and sleepless night. A great way to start off almost a week of camping…

Have you had a rough night camping in a tent before? What was your experience?


 

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Fun Times at the Bay of Fundy

The Bay of Fundy is well known for extreme tides and the rock formations that result from the tidal erosion. The thing about tides is, they kind of just happen without regard to your travel plans and when you plan to be near the water. We had a bit of a late start leaving Halifax (which you can read about here) and so missed the low tide in the morning when we arrived at Hopewell Cape on the Bay of Fundy in the afternoon. (You can learn about the technical aspect of the tides here and check out the tidal timing here.) Luckily for us, there are two high and two low tides each day, that’s semidiurnal for those in the know.

 

Fun times at the Bay of Fundy

 

We arrived just after high tide and walked around to the various viewpoints to take pictures. The views were good, but not quite the awe-inspiring vision we had in mind and saw during our online research.

 

Fun times at the Bay of Fundy

 

Fun times at the Bay of Fundy

 

With the two high and low tides each day there is about six hours separating each extreme. The tides here are considered the highest in the world. Twice each day 160 billion tonnes of water flows in and out of the Bay of Fundy. The tides peak at around 16 metres (50 feet) which is as high as a five-story building!

 

Fun times at the Bay of Fundy

 

Fun times at the Bay of Fundy

 

Having seen the bay at high tide which meant that a few walkways were barred off and covered in water, we expected the landscape to change dramatically at low tide. We had planned ahead and knew we would have a bit of a wait, and so enjoyed a picnic in the afternoon sun while the tides were changing.

 

Fun times at the Bay of Fundy

 

A few short hours later we headed back to the viewpoints on the Bay of Fundy and were awestruck at how much everything had changed. Where did all of the water go?

 

Low Tide at Bay of Fundy

 

The tide movement is even more spectacular when you compare high and low tide moments next to each other.

 

High Tide

 

High Tide at Bay of Fundy

 

Low Tide

 

Low Tide at Bay of Fundy

 

High Tide

 

High Tide at Bay of Fundy

 

Low Tide

 

Low Tide at Bay of Fundy

 

We were able to walk around the newly exposed seafloor and take pictures as the sun began to set in the distance.

 

Fun times at the Bay of Fundy

 

Fun times at the Bay of Fundy

 

Shop Bettina's Look:

 

Fun times at the Bay of Fundy

 

The extreme tides here are very special to see and you won’t believe it until you see it yourself!

Not far away from Hopewell Cape is the village of Alma, which experiences the extreme tides right in its harbour.

 

Fun times at the Bay of Fundy

 

Fisherman here definitely are aware of the tides and store their boats on stands! How they got the boats on the stands in the first place is beyond me.

 

Fun times at the Bay of Fundy

 

We really enjoyed our evening drive along the Bay of Funday and south to Saint John as the setting sun brought new views around each bend in the road and revealing the beauty of the Canadian Maritime Province.

 

Fun times at the Bay of Fundy

 

Bettina was especially smitten with the fields of daisies.

 

Field of Daisies New Brunswick

 

Field of Daisies New Brunswick

 

Field of Daisies New Brunswick

 

We arrived in Saint John late in the evening and needed to leave fairly early for our long drive back to Boston. Even though it’s not usually our strong suit, we managed to get up early in order to take a short walk around the city before heading out.

 

Sunrise in Saint John

 

Sunrise in Saint John

 

Morning Walk in Saint John

 

We enjoyed walking around the Saint John harbour the most. There is no doubt that the waterfront would be buzzing with life on warm summer afternoons or any time after 8am, which is when we were there.

 

Morning Walk in Saint John

 

We even spotted Theodore Tugboat on vacation from Halifax this summer.

 

Theodore Tugboat in Saint John

 

Our drive back to Boston was fairly uneventful. We wanted to leave with lots of extra time as border waits and holiday traffic can be unpredictable. We spent a grand total of 2 minutes waiting in line to cross the border, and stopped at the nearest gas station to fill up the car where we met this friendly Canadian ready to celebrate the Fourth of July!

 

Dog with Hat and Glasses in Convertible

 

Would you go on a trip over Fourth of July to get more use of your day off? Or would you fear you’re missing out on celebrations at home? Let us know in the comments below!

 


 

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East Coast of Nova Scotia

Arriving in Nova Scotia was a highlight for us, as we had now reached all three of the Maritime Provinces.

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

We started our day in Lunenburg, a UNESCO world heritage site, and home to many colourful buildings. It was, unfortunately, a bit of a cloudy and grey morning, but you wouldn’t know it looking at all of the colourful houses!

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

A few more houses in case you didn’t get the idea.

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

Lunenburg is full of old and historical buildings. The Bank of Montreal branch made us feel like we were transported back in time or landed in a Harry Potter movie.

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

The town has a rich history of agriculture, fishing, and ship-building. You may have heard of, or at least seen the most famous ship built here, the Bluenose, featured prominently on the Canadian dime. The commemorative replica, the Bluenose II, was docked in Lunenburg during our visit.

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

We left Lunenburg relatively soon (not completely unrelated to me being freezing cold and the views being quite grey). In the hope for more sunshine, we drove to Peggy’s Cove and were amazed by the views! It was at this point that Nova Scotia completely stole our hearts.

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

Seeing the Peggy’s Point Lighthouse from a distance was simply breathtaking.

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

Once we actually arrived at Peggy’s Cove we loved walking around and exploring the small fishing community.

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

I was worried Peggy’s Cove would be an over-hyped tourist destination, but we found the place surprisingly undeveloped, and almost magical. Walking around the village you can get a real sense of the simple life of the people that lived here (before all the tourists arrived) and the struggle of living right on the wild Atlantic Ocean.

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

Peggy’s Point Lighthouse is clearly the star of the show here.

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

We could have walked around the lighthouse for hours. Even though there were a few tourists there, the place felt calm and we enjoyed watching the waves break on the rounded rocks.  Peggy's Cove is exactly what we thought Nova Scotia would be like and we highly recommend you visit.

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

Shop My Style

 

My necklace is by GLDN and my purse is from the cutest Chicago online boutique called White Elephant Designs. I linked a similar one below.

 

 

After some delicious mint chocolate ice cream sorbet, we were on the road again, pointed North towards Halifax - the capital of Nova Scotia.

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

We saved our exploring of the city for the next day, so sought out a restaurant for dinner and can highly recommend the seafood at Five Fisherman. Our selection for the evening included local Mussels, PEI oysters, a shrimp cocktail, brussels sprouts and some lobster mash for good measure.  We also dared each other to take ever-increasing dips of wasabi on our shrimp. There were no winners. 😀

Also, if you are still keeping score, we were now three for three on the seafood and ice cream challenge.

 

The next morning we were greeted with sunshine as we walked around the Halifax waterfront and explored the city.

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

 

As we walked around the waterfront, we came across a few very Canadian food booths. We'll leave it up to you to guess whether we had Beavertails, Poutine, or Cow's Ice Cream for breakfast.

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

The city has a large number of historical buildings, almost all of which have a view of the harbour as the city is situated on a hill overlooking the bay.

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

If you have more time to spend in the city there are also a number of museums dedicated to the extensive history and culture of the area.

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

As we were preparing to head back out on the road, we had one last ‘attration’ to see. Every day (other than Christmas) at 12 noon, a canon is being fired from Citadel Hill as a tribute to Halifax’s history as a major stronghold for the British. We drove up near Citadel Hill just before noon and waited.

 

East Coast of Nova Scotia

 

Now, we knew it was going to happen, and when it was going to happen (give or take a minute) and we still jumped out of our skins. It was LOUD! And with that we were off with a bang heading West!

 

Have you been to the East Coast of Nova Scotia? Have you ever tried Beavertails? Let us know in the comments below!


 

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A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

After a day of driving, we were ready to tour Canada's most densely populated province: Prince Edward Island. Manhattan this is not, as its capital Charlottetown, is home to about half of the 150,000 people that call this island home. Most people arriving in Prince Edward Island will begin their sightseeing about 12.9km away as they cross the Confederation Bridge from New Brunswick.

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

We stopped at the Cape Jourimain Nature Centre just before you begin the drive across the bridge to get the best views and can highly recommend it.

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

From here you can walk around on the sandy beach and dip your toes in the (frigid) waters of the Northumberland Strait. Fun fact: The Confederation Bridge is the longest bridge in the world over ice-covered waters, and it even cuts cool patterns in the ice! (see these pictures here).

 

Confederation Bridge - A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

Confederation Bridge - A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

Driving around PEI we were immediately at ease and got a sense of the relaxed pace of island life.

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

The province is mostly rural, containing lots of sprawling fields and farms. Summertime is a great time to visit PEI as lupins are in full bloom around the island in vibrant colours of purple, pink, and white!

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

Of course, Bettina couldn’t resist a picture or two amongst the flowers (while trying not get to stung by a bee)!

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

Shop Bettina's Look

 

Her necklaces are from GLDN and she wears them almost every day.

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

Arriving at to the entrance gate of Prince Edward Island National Park, we were getting our wallets out to pay the entrance fee, where the friendly park ranger informed us that *unfortunately* due to it being Canada Day, the entrance was free!

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

We quickly spent all the money we saved though as we came across Richard’s, an island-favourite fish shack serving up delicious lobster rolls and fish and chips.

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

It was possibly the freshest fish and chips we had ever eaten and we would go back any time!

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

We strolled around the beach a little bit but left for Charlottetown soon as the dark clouds rolled in.

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

Charlottetown is a very quaint, historic town, and easily walkable. We really enjoyed wandering the streets,  checking out the many boutiques, historical houses, and waterfront path.

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

As we were walking along, minding our own business, we came across a formed crowd around a blue waterfront building. It was Cow's Ice Cream!

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

Cow’s has been scooping up old-fashioned ice cream with some very clever names for decades and is considered one of the world’s best places to get ice cream. On a summer day by the ocean who can resist ice cream? This was the second day of our road trip and so far we were two for two on having seafood and ice cream each day.

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

How about some Wowie Cowie, Caramel Moocchiato, Cowconut Cream Pie, or a classic Cownadian Maple? There’s just too many good ones.

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

Bettina couldn't resist spending some time talking and posing with the locals also.

 

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

After exploring the old town, we made our way to the Beaconsfield Historic House but were a bit late to check out the museum.

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

Instead, we followed the crowd and walked over to Victoria Park to take in some live music, views and festivities before heading out of the city to our next hotel. It was Canada Day after all!

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

A Scoop of Prince Edward Island

 

Have you been to Prince Edward Island and sampled some Cow’s ice cream?


 

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